Five zombie philanthropic ideas that won’t die?

Foreign Policy has an interesting piece entitled “Five Zombie Economic Ideas That Won’t Die.” They’re bits of economic “wisdom” that the economic crisis is meant to have shown we ought to abandon, but for some reason people (and policymakers) stubbornly keep alive. The┬ácandidates are things like trickle-down theory and the idea that privatization is always good.

While I enjoy any chance to excoriate lock-step laissez-faire dogma, this piece has me thinking: there must be at least five zombie philanthropic ideas that won’t die. Here are a few candidates, which I’ll expand upon in future posts:

  • Foundations are legally prohibited from doing advocacy.
  • General-operating support doesn’t allow you to demonstrate impact.
  • If we accept unsolicited proposals, we’ll be drowned in inquiries.
  • Every grant should have rigorous evaluation.
  • It’s possible to ameliorate the power imbalance between grantmakers and grantseekers through open communication.

What are other zombie philanthropic ideas that won’t die?

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One Response to “Five zombie philanthropic ideas that won’t die?”

  1. The Blog Briefly Known as "Democratizing Philanthropy?" » Blog Archive » Five zombie philanthropic ideas that won’t die (#1) Says:

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